Scooby Whacks (Good News Week 23/3/09: monologue)

A study by Iowa State University found evidence of increased violence amongst children who’d been exposed to cartoons like Scooby-Doo. The kids would’ve got away with it too, if it wasn’t for those meddling researchers.

A study by Iowa State University found evidence of increased violence amongst children who’d been exposed to cartoons like Scooby-Doo & Pokemon. But that’s not the cartoons themselves – it’s the subliminal messages hidden in the ad breaks.

A study by Iowa State University found evidence of increased violence amongst children who’d been exposed to cartoons like Scooby-Doo & Pokemon. Ro no!

A study by Iowa State University found evidence of increased violence amongst children who’d been exposed to cartoons like Scooby-Doo. But it turns out it’s not actually the cartoons at all – it’s that mean old real estate agent DRESSED UP like a cartoon, so he can scare everyone away and keep the lost gold of Pirate Pete all for himself! Gee willikers!

A study by Iowa State University found evidence of increased violence amongst children who’d been exposed to cartoons like Scooby-Doo. And kids who grew up watching Pepe le Peu all grow up to be serial cat-rapists.

A study by Iowa State University found evidence of increased violence amongst children who’d been exposed to cartoons like Scooby-Doo & Pokemon. Pokemon particularly encourages bullying – they like to Pik-at-u.

Even though the cartoons are aimed at children, they contain significantly more brutality than shows for older audiences. Though I’m happy to have a punch-on with Mikey if it increases our appeal to the littl’uns.

Even though the cartoons are aimed at children, they contain significantly more brutality than shows for older audiences. Except for “Hole in the Wall”.

The study found TV characters also taught children “indirect aggression”, such as rumour-spreading, gossiping, eye-rolling, ignoring others, and dressing up as a ghost pirate. / and trapping innocent wildlife in Poké Balls. / and training captive animals to fight against each other to determine the One True Pokémon Master.

The study found TV characters also taught children “indirect aggression”, such as rumour-spreading, gossiping, eye-rolling & ignoring others, as well as giving them an unhealthy appetite for Scooby Snacks.

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